Wall calendars are still relevant, even in the digital age, but few are as practical as this one from Effective Microorganisms. The company produces “useful regenerated microorganisms” containing yeast, photosynthetic bacteria, and lactic acid bacteria and claims the concoction creates “synergy among microorganisms and larger forms of life including plants, livestock, pets, and humans.”

Clearly, their sales proposition is a bit confusing. This is why the calendar works so well. Users tear off a square per day, submerge it into a liter of water, and the solution becomes a handy household product, such as fertilizer, deodorizer, or all-purpose cleaner. Agency: Creative Juice, Bangkok, Thailand

To market its waterproof mp3 player, Sony dropped one each into bottles of water and sold the devices in gym vending machines. The benefit behind the innovative packaging of “The Bottled Walkman” is that it instantly showcases the product’s main selling feature. |PS| likes that it’s a built-in litmus test of the mp3 player’s waterproof promise. Agency:  Fcb Auckland

To market its waterproof mp3 player, Sony dropped one each into bottles of water and sold the devices in gym vending machines. The benefit behind the innovative packaging of “The Bottled Walkman” is that it instantly showcases the product’s main selling feature. |PS| likes that it’s a built-in litmus test of the mp3 player’s waterproof promise. Agency: Fcb Auckland

If one’s own name is the sweetest sound, then it stands to reason that one’s own face is the sweetest image, no? French frame store L’Eclat du Cadre tested the theory by tagging local cars with this clever marketing campaign. The paper frames are made to look like gilded antiques with a message on the back that reads: “Any picture looks better with a beautiful frame.” Agency: BDDP & Fils

A laundry detergent brand that was new to the market skipped the TV/radio ad route and opted to give customers and prospects imprinted clothespins, or “nose pins” instead. Illustrations on each pin depict cartoon figures smelling the fresh scent of the detergent, underscoring the brand’s message that the product smells so good that users won’t want to stop using it. Agency: TBWA, Lima, Peru

A laundry detergent brand that was new to the market skipped the TV/radio ad route and opted to give customers and prospects imprinted clothespins, or “nose pins” instead. Illustrations on each pin depict cartoon figures smelling the fresh scent of the detergent, underscoring the brand’s message that the product smells so good that users won’t want to stop using it. Agency: TBWA, Lima, Peru

You know a campaign is good when it has its own radio station.

This DIY radio was handed out to university students on behalf of the Australian Defense Force (aka air force). The kits contained everything the students needed to build a radio, except for the instructions. The promotion was developed to serve as a sort of job interview for technicians, with the thinking being that the most-skilled candidates would be able to construct the radio on their own. Once flipped on, the radio broadcasted this message: “Congratulations, you’ve successfully constructed a radio and located Air Force FM.” This greeting was followed by contact information and played on a constant loop. Agency: George Patterson Y&R, Melbourne